Thursday, November 20, 2014

The Results - soy wax batik

Probably the hardest part of working with wax is the removal of it. Years ago I tried batik and swore never to do it again because of that reason. I was using the traditional set up of part parafin and part beeswax. Beeswax is too soft and won't crackle; parafin is too hard and crackles too much, so a mix of the 2 works best. I decided to give it another try after reading Rayna Gillman's book which devotes many pages to the use of soy wax. It's a little more user friendly and easily removed from fabric.
To remove, lay newsprint over the top and underneath; use a a hot iron which immediately melts the wax and is absorbed into the paper.

I found the fabric to be just a tad stiff but still very useable and I will try washing it which Rayna suggests. Many of the fabrics used were probably too busy to begin with so the waxed areas are hard to find.
This piece is probably more noticeable because I used solids rather than a busy print.
Here is another marbled piece done in the opposite color set up with the yellow being in the center.
I liked the way this turned out, very busy but I liked the wash of color over it more than the resisted areas of wax.
I just went through my scraps, pulling pieces....this piece was a piece of silk that was crimped as a demo for a workshop. It was a China silk and very thin so the crimping/pleats were very effective.
A lot of the wax impressions showed up better, probably because I started with a solid.
This was a marbled piece I didn't like and the only cotton in the group;  I think I like it better with a wash over it and some wax resisted areas.
My daughter is coming this weekend with my granddaughter and then we caravan back to Atlanta for Thanksgiving...will be a whirlwind of a week....I am linked to Off the Wall Fridays and Whoop, Whoop Friday.
Til next time...
Judy

3 comments:

  1. These turned out so interesting...love all the greens.....nice!

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  2. I far prefer to put my wax-coated cloth in a bucket of hot water as Jane Dunnewold suggests. Less work and you don't get the wax halo you often get when trying to iron the wax out of the fabric.

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  3. I like the greens too. Happy Thanksgiving, Judy!

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